DJI stresses that corruption that cost company £115m in losses does not ‘represent our culture, or our 14,000 employees’

Corruption at the heart of DJI’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, is expected to cost the company up to £115m in losses.

On Friday, Commercial Drone Professional reported on how the drone manufacturer is currently investigating the cases of ‘serious corruption’, which were found during quality control last year.

DJI has now confirmed the details of the corruption to CDP and described how certain employees had increased the cost of certain products for ‘personal financial gain.’

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A spokesperson said: “We hold our employees to the highest ethical standards and take any violation of our code of ethics very seriously. During a recent investigation, DJI itself found some employees inflated the cost of parts and materials for certain products for personal financial gain.”

DJI has moved quickly to address the breaches and set up a “high-level” taskforce that will also be responsible for creating more robust internal procedures in future.

The statement continued: “We took swift action to address this issue, fired the bad actors, and contacted law enforcement officials. We continue to investigate the situation and are cooperating fully with law enforcement’s investigation.”

The company was, however, keen to stress how the corruption was not widespread and was not representative of the company as a whole.

It added: “These actions do not represent DJI, our culture, or our 14,000 employees, who work hard every day to serve customers and develop cutting-edge technologies.

“We are taking steps to strengthen internal controls and have established new channels for employees to submit confidential and anonymous reports relating to any violations of the company’s ethical and workplace conduct policies.”

You can read CDP’s report from when the news broke on Friday here:

DJI investigates multiple corruption cases set to leave it with losses of £116m

Tags : businessCorruptioncrimeDJIfinancial
Alex Douglas

The author Alex Douglas

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