New report predicts global drone defence spending to exceed £8bn

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A report from Verdnatix has suggested that corporations and civil government agencies will be forced to spend £8.2bn ($10.8bn) on drone defence by 2039 if regulations do not become strict.

The independent research and consulting firm carried out the analysis is based on the threat that UAVs could pose to 42,600 airports, data centres, industrial facilities, ports, power plants and prisons located in the US, Canada and the European Union.

David Metcalfe, Verdantix CEO, commented: “The drone attack at the UK’s Gatwick Airport in December 2018 raised awareness of the financial costs and disruption that a malicious drone attack can cause.”

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He added: “Every month hundreds of vulnerable civil government, industrial and commercial sites are targeted by illegal UAV flights or simply by drone enthusiasts who don’t know the rules. Examples range from smuggling at ports, to delivering contraband to prison inmates, to snooping on commercial meetings. The versatility of payloads that can be attached to drones makes them a huge threat.”

The Verdantix report provides insights into how complex sites with a large surface area and multiple buildings will need to spend £1.1m ($1.5m) on drone defence tech.

It describes how spending on drone defence solutions will grow from £61m ($80m) in 2019 to £8.2bn ($10.8bn) in 2039 at a 28% CAGR.

Additionally, it said that by 2039 prisons will spend £668m ($876m), airports £1.1bn ($1.5bn) and industrial facilities £4.6bn ($6.5bn).

The independent research and consulting firm carried out the analysis is based on the threat that UAVs could pose to 42,600 airports, data centres, industrial facilities, ports, power plants and prisons located in the US, Canada and the European Union.

David Metcalfe, Verdantix CEO, commented: “The drone attack at the UK’s Gatwick Airport in December 2018 raised awareness of the financial costs and disruption that a malicious drone attack can cause.”

He added: “Every month hundreds of vulnerable civil government, industrial and commercial sites are targeted by illegal UAV flights or simply by drone enthusiasts who don’t know the rules. Examples range from smuggling at ports, to delivering contraband to prison inmates, to snooping on commercial meetings. The versatility of payloads that can be attached to drones makes them a huge threat.”

The Verdantix report provides insights into how complex sites with a large surface area and multiple buildings will need to spend $1.5m on drone defence tech.

It describes how spending on drone defence solutions will grow from $80m in 2019 to $10.8bn in 2039 at a 28% CAGR.

Additionally, it said that by 2039 prisons will spend $876m, airports $1.5bn and industrial facilities $6.5bn.

Tags : counter-droneDrone DefenceVerdantix
Alex Douglas

The author Alex Douglas

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